Crishna: Unfurling Mayo Flag at the Antarctic
Mayo Then and Now

Jack Gibson and Aung San Suu Kyi

An excerpt of a letter from Jack Gibson:

October 20, 1970
Dear Charles [Clarke] -
I had a wonderful time in Bhutan starting off surprisingly well by crossing the King as we reached Thimpu. He jumped out of his jeep to welcome us, which I hadn't expected. On another occasion he came to the guest house to speak to me, and I wanted John Levy who was with me to record their folk and religious music to have a word with him about getting to Tongsa and Bumtang, so I sent a message quickly to John to come quickly and speak to the King.  He was in his bath (it was only 0730) and thought I meant on the telephone, so down he came in an ancient dressing gown!

We met a very good fellow there, Michael Aris, who speaks Bhutanese and is much better at looking after John than I could be. I had to get back here [Mayo College, Ajmer] as I have guests arriving tomorrow, so have left John with Michael to look after him. It's a small world. Michael is engaged to the daughter of Aung San the Burmese general who was murdered and was much loved by his people. The girl's guardian in England is Paul Gore-Booth, and he is to marry them in the Burmese way later this year. Paul is also the English guardian of Winston - Hso Khan Pha - son of the first president of Burma. I can't remember whether you have met him, one of my Doon school climbers, now in Canada."

Notes:
1. Dr. Charles Clarke was a British climber who scaled Swargorohini II (6247 m) in 1974 and was the expedition doctor in Chris Bonington's Everest attempt without oxygen in 1982. Dr. Clarke and his wife spent two weeks with Jack Gibson at Mayo College in June 1971.
2. John Levy was a musicologist. Gibson's description of him:"A very rich Jew who could afford the best possible equipment for his hobby of recording folk music all over the world. I first met him when he turned up at Mayo College looking and smelling like the lowest class of hippy after spending a week in the Dargah here recording the music played at the Urs. He had a letter from a friend, and we got to know each other well. Eventually I wrote to the King of Bhutan suggesting I should bring him to record there and it was a great success. He gave me tapes of the music which the BBC played in the third programme." Some of his recordings are in the British Library and the original recordings and remainder of the collection are housed at the School of Scottish Studies, Edinburgh [http://www.celtscot.ed.ac.uk/].
3. For more on Michael Aris and Aung San Suu Kyi see the article in
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/burmamyanmar/8948018/The-untold-love-story-of-Burmas-Aung-San-Suu-Kyi.html

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